Archive for the ‘African-American History’ Category

Although many have wondered about his birthplace, President Obama is indeed a natural-born U.S. citizen. State officials in Hawaii confirmed again that he was born in Honolulu. One question: Since when is “African” a race? Your baby could one day become the president of the United States, too. Speak your peace.


Update: The Cambridge police just dropped the charges! Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., best known for his work in African-American ancestral research, was arrested last week by Cambridge, Mass., police on his own front porch. Gates had just returned from China and found his front door jammed. He went to the backdoor of the […]


President Obama announced today his nominee for U.S. surgeon general and SHE is BLACK. Dr. Regina Benjamin attended Xavier University in New Orleans, was a member of the second class of the Morehouse School of Medicine, and received an M.D. degree from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. A family physician, Dr. Benjamin has rebuilt the […]


You may recall the six young Black men in Jena, La., who were charged with attempted murder for a schoolyard fight with white schoolmate Justin Barker. After a major civil rights demonstration protesting the inappropriate severity of the charges, international media attention, and fund-raising to pay for legal representation, the charges were later reduced to second-degree […]


American icon Michael Jackson, lead singer of the ’70s R&B group The Jackson 5, later renamed The Jacksons after a record-label change, and winner of 10 individual Grammys as a solo artist in the ’80s, died today of sudden cardiac arrest in Los Angeles. He was 50. The King of Pop made history with the 1982 release of […]


The U.S. Senate passed a non-binding resolution on June 18 apologizing for American slavery (1619 – 1865) and “Jim Crow” laws following slavery through the 1960s that continued to deprive Black people of basic human rights. The resolution concludes:  Whereas it is important for the people of the United States, who legally recognized slavery through the Constitution and the […]


Founded in 1966, the National Organization for Women, the nation’s largest feminist advocacy organization, held national elections over the weekend to assemble a new team of leaders. Latifa Lyles (above) ran for president but lost and she will not retain her position as Vice President of Membership to which she was elected in 2005. Allendra Letsome is NOW’s […]


FOX is making a seemingly serious effort to embed diversity themes and talent at the earliest stages of program development. Ron Taylor, the TV network’s new VP of diverse programming and content, is the most recent example of this effort. Taylor will oversee script development reflective of diverse themes and/or written by writers from diverse […]


Born in 1904 in Sealy, TX, jazz icon Huey Long enjoyed a long, dynamic career as a guitarist. He began his career with a banjo, playing with a Louisiana jazz band in the 1920s. By the ’30s, he had switched to a guitar, moved to Chicago, and recorded with the great Louis Armstrong. He later joined Earl […]


Cleveland-born Alyssa Stanton, 45, will lead a predominantly white synagogue in Greenville, NC, beginning in August. She is the first African-American woman to be ordained as a rabbi. Raised in a Pentecostal family, the single mother of a 14-year-old adopted daughter says she was surprised by the national interest in her ordination. Her new 60-family synagogue, […]


Hailed as the Queen of the Blues, legendary blues vocalist Koko Taylor died June 3, following surgery on May 19 to correct a gastrointestinal bleed. She was 80. Best known for her 1966 hit “Wang Dang Doodle,” which sold over 1 million copies, her nearly 45-year career was still going strong until just a few weeks before her […]


Xerox chief Anne Mulcahy, who is credited with saving the company from bankruptcy, announced Thursday she’s stepping down as CEO, but will stay on as chairwoman. Her handpicked successor is Ursula Burns, 50, an African-American woman who is a 30-year Xerox veteran. She’s worked right alongside Mulcahy to reinvent Xerox,  managing corporate strategy, IT, human resources, and global accounts […]


  Suzanne de Passe, the chairman and CEO of de Passe Entertainment who began her career at Motown Records, along with Steven Spielberg and Madison Jones, will produce the first motion picture authorized by The King estate that examines the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. DreamWorks Studios acquired the rights to the life of the […]


Veteran actress Zoe Saldana, 30, plays the lovely Nyota Uhura in the new Star Trek prequel, directed by J.J. Abrams, that opened in theatres over the weekend and soared to #1 with an estimated $76.5 million in box-office receipts. The role of Uhura was made famous by Nichelle Nichols in the 60s TV series by the […]


Born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree, Sojourner Truth was a passionate activist, fighting against slavery and for women’s rights in the 19th century. She died 126 years ago in Battle Creek, Mich. Yesterday, Sojourner Truth became the first African-American woman to be memorialized with a bust in the U.S. Capitol. The ceremony at Emancipation Hall was led by […]


The U.S. Supreme Court once again held hearings today on the Voting Rights Act of 1965. At issue: a provision that prevents discriminatory voting practices in several states, where these practices were once common, and requires these states to get approval from the Justice Department before changing any voting procedures, especially those that could suppress voting among people of […]


Indian women who live in poverty in areas similar to the one featured in the Oscar-winning film Slumdog Millionaire are considered “cursed” if their hair and skin are “too dark.” If that isn’t sad enough, these women are also viewed disparagingly by the society in which they live if they give birth to only female children. Some […]


Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson won the Pulitzer Prize Monday for his commentaries on the 2008 presidential campaign. He says he had to face the challenge “to believe what we were seeing and hearing and experiencing and not what we were expecting.” Apparently, even Robinson didn’t expect President Obama to win. The Pulitzer Prizes are determined and […]


Former NBA player Isiah Thomas, 48, signed a five-year agreement with Florida International University on Tuesday — Thomas even agreed to donate his salary to the school, signaling how desperately he wants the job. Drafted by the Detroit Pistons in 1981 as a point guard, Thomas helped his team win two NBA championships. After his career ended as […]


President Obama was nominated this year for two British Book Awards in London. His 2004 biography “Dreams From My Father” won the biography prize. He was also nominated for author of the year for his New York Times #1 best-seller “The Audacity of Hope,” published in 2006, but lost to Aravind Adiga for the novel “The White Tiger.” Write on.