Archive for the ‘African-American History’ Category

Although many have wondered about his birthplace, President Obama is indeed a natural-born U.S. citizen. State officials in Hawaii confirmed again that he was born in Honolulu. One question: Since when is “African” a race? Your baby could one day become the president of the United States, too. Speak your peace.


Update: The Cambridge police just dropped the charges! Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., best known for his work in African-American ancestral research, was arrested last week by Cambridge, Mass., police on his own front porch. Gates had just returned from China and found his front door jammed. He went to the backdoor of the […]


President Obama announced today his nominee for U.S. surgeon general and SHE is BLACK. Dr. Regina Benjamin attended Xavier University in New Orleans, was a member of the second class of the Morehouse School of Medicine, and received an M.D. degree from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. A family physician, Dr. Benjamin has rebuilt the […]


You may recall the six young Black men in Jena, La., who were charged with attempted murder for a schoolyard fight with white schoolmate Justin Barker. After a major civil rights demonstration protesting the inappropriate severity of the charges, international media attention, and fund-raising to pay for legal representation, the charges were later reduced to second-degree […]


American icon Michael Jackson, lead singer of the ’70s R&B group The Jackson 5, later renamed The Jacksons after a record-label change, and winner of 10 individual Grammys as a solo artist in the ’80s, died today of sudden cardiac arrest in Los Angeles. He was 50. The King of Pop made history with the 1982 release of […]


The U.S. Senate passed a non-binding resolution on June 18 apologizing for American slavery (1619 – 1865) and “Jim Crow” laws following slavery through the 1960s that continued to deprive Black people of basic human rights. The resolution concludes:  Whereas it is important for the people of the United States, who legally recognized slavery through the Constitution and the […]


Founded in 1966, the National Organization for Women, the nation’s largest feminist advocacy organization, held national elections over the weekend to assemble a new team of leaders. Latifa Lyles (above) ran for president but lost and she will not retain her position as Vice President of Membership to which she was elected in 2005. Allendra Letsome is NOW’s […]